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Correction to: CancerCostMod: a model of the healthcare expenditure, patient resource use, and patient co-payment costs for Australian cancer patients

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The original article was published in Health Economics Review 2018 8:28

Correction to: Health Economics Review (2018) 8:28

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13561-018-0212-8

Correction

Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported errors on their article.

In Tables 3 and 4 of this manuscript, the costs presented in the “hospital episodes”, “total cost to the health care system” and “average health care cost per person” columns were incorrect. Consequently, the numbers in the “Ratios” and “standard errors” columns related to the Hospital Episodes section of Table 5 were incorrect. The corrected Tables are shown below.

Table 3 Total cost of cancer during the first 12-months post-diagnosis by cancer type1
Table 4 Total cost of cancer for the first 12-months post-diagnosis, by population groups1
Table 5 Five generalized linear models of the cost of cancer for the first 12-months1

Subsequently, the following sentences needed to be corrected. Corrected content is shown in bold:

Abstract, Results, Discussion

The total initial cost associated with newly diagnosed cancer for the healthcare system is $4.8 billion. Hospital episodes accounted for 80% of the healthcare expenditure, followed by PBS (13%) and MBS (5%).

Results, subheading “Results of Cost of cancer during the first 12-months post-diagnosis by population group”, 2nd paragraph:

Indigenous Australians had significantly higher costs for ED presentations (23% higher), but significantly lower costs for MBS rebates (8% lower), PBS rebates (18% lower), and patient co-payments (61% lower) compared to non-Indigenous Australians. [The words “for hospital episodes (22%)” have been removed from the sentence].

The costs for hospital episodes were significantly higher in the first 12-months post-diagnosis with increasing remoteness, 4% for people living in inner and outer regional areas, and 10% higher for people living in remote and very remote areas compared to those living in metropolitan areas. [these percents were previously reported as 6% and 15% higher, respectively].

Compared to those living in the most disadvantaged areas (IRSD Q1), those in quintiles 4–5 had decreasing costs associated with hospital episodes [quintiles 3–4 were previously reported].

Reference

  1. 1.

    Bates N, Callander E, Lindsay D, et al. CancerCostMod: a model of the healthcare expenditure, patient resource use, and patient co-payment costs for Australian cancer patients. Health Econ Rev. 2018;8:–28. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13561-018-0212-8.

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Author information

Correspondence to Nicole Bates.

Additional information

The original article can be found online at https://doi.org/10.1186/s13561-018-0212-8

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Bates, N., Callander, E., Lindsay, D. et al. Correction to: CancerCostMod: a model of the healthcare expenditure, patient resource use, and patient co-payment costs for Australian cancer patients. Health Econ Rev 9, 2 (2019) doi:10.1186/s13561-019-0219-9

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